The Seven Philosophies of Good Life Property Management

Steve Welty

Today I want to share with you the philosophies of Good Life. I had my team share what they thought our core philosophies were, combined it with mine, and narrowed that list down to these seven. These are the things that matter to us and that contribute to our company mission.

Life Improved

This our main “why” here at Good Life. How can we improve our clients’ lives? What about our vendors, tenants, and team members? This inspires people to take action and get inspired. My dad always told me, “The best is yet to come,” taken from the famous Frank Sinatra song. I always believed this and believed that life was always going to improve. This has carried on to my team as well. They are always getting better and always working to improve themselves, which in turn improves the business.

One of the best ways to improve our own lives is by improving other people’s lives. How can we serve people and add value? Because of this realization, we stopped taking certain types of clients and properties that weren’t a good fit or ended up causing the team and our systems a lot of stress and problems. While making money and adding doors is great, improving lives is our primary goal and that means putting that ahead of anything else. When you start focusing on improving the lives of your clients, you may come to realize that some of them aren’t the best fit for your company. But if you continue to serve people and serve your clients, the leads will still come and your company will grow.

How Can We Help People the Most?

This is our north star. It’s similar to life improved, but this is something we ask ourselves on a daily basis. For example, when I have my weekly sales and marketing meeting, occasionally I’ll ask how certain content is getting us more leads and generating more doors. Olivia, our content marketing manager, will often check me and remind me that our content is designed to help people and educate them. In turn, we bring in the right kind of leads while also educating the masses and helping others.

Unique Ability Teamwork

If you’ve been listening to the Good Life podcast for a while, you’ll know what a unique ability is. If you haven’t heard that term, a unique ability is essentially a small subset of things that each team member does exceptionally well. The first step is identifying what your unique ability is and then spending as much time as possible working in it. This is key for the owner of the business, but what really leads to success is when it trickles down to your team. Your team members shouldn’t be wasting time doing things that they hate. At Good Life, I ask them at their quarterly reviews what the least favorite thing they are doing is and see if I can help them out of it. Your team should be doing things that they are motivated to do. That is how you will see better results.

Extreme Ownership

Extreme Ownership basically boils down to this: you are 100% responsible for the outcome of your company. Each person on your team should be 100% responsible for their roles as well. Accountability is a big thing in a business. Recently, we had a situation where a team member made an expensive mistake. I asked them to tell me what happened. Instead of making excuses, blaming people/circumstances, etc., they owned up and said was an oversight, took full responsibility, and learned from their mistake so that it wouldn’t happen again. This was exactly what I wanted to hear. These are the kinds of traits you want in your company. Mistakes are bound to happen; how your team (and you) handle them is what makes the difference.

Focus Time

This is something I teach to everyone on our team. If someone asked me what the biggest hack for success was, I would say quiet focus time, everyday, on your highest value activity. A lot of people are surprised to hear this, but it makes a big difference. Everyone at Good Life doesn’t just work in the business, they work on the business. This focus time, whether it’s 30 minutes twice a week or an hour each day, is crucial for them to get clarity on that high-value task. This will not only help you and the business, but it will help them gain confidence as well.

How You Do Anything is How You Do Everything

Humans are creatures of habit. If you have a sloppy home environment, you likely have a sloppy work environment. Business is just a reflection of who we are as people. Everything you do matters--how you reply to an email, how you leave the kitchen after you eat, etc. All of these things boil down to who you are as a person. People that don’t think before they reply to a client or people that leave a mess everywhere they go may not be the most desirable people to have working with you.

Entrepreneurial Team

The entrepreneurial team gives everyone the mindset that they are in charge of their own little business. The leasing manager has their own leasing business, the customer service has their own, and so on. This opposes the old idea that I am on top, my team is below me, and I tell them what to do. We don’t micromanage the entrepreneurial team. Because we are results-based, we count on each team member to prove their worth and manage themselves. This teaches them that there is no ceiling as far as how much they can achieve.

 

These are the seven philosophies that have greatly contributed to Good Life’s success. I hope this provided you with some clarity on your business, your team, and yourself.

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